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What are the symptoms of breast cancer?
Breast cancer is not limited to a mass or breast lump; it can take other forms as well. The disease may cause the skin on or around the breast to change. If you notice any of the following changes consult a doctor immediately: • Changing Skin Texture: Breast cancer may inflame the skin cells, thereby changing the texture. Look for skin thickening in any part of the breast or scaly skin around the areola and nipple. • Nipple Discharge: Thick or thin discharge from the nipple – be it green or yellow, red or milky – is usually noncancerous, but may denote breast cancer in some individuals. • Dimpling: Skin dimpling is often indicative of aggressive inflammatory breast cancer. The cancer cells cause lymph fluid to buildup in the breasts, and the breasts become swollen with pitted or dimpled skin. • Lymph Node Changes: A cancer cell will travel to the underarm lymph node section after leaving the breast and cause swelling. In some cases, lymph nodes are even noticeable around the collarbone. They appear as firm, small, swollen lumps that are tender to the touch. • Nipple or Breast Pain: Changes to skin cells because of breast cancer may induce pain, discomfort, and tenderness in the breast. While the condition is painless, it is best not to ignore any symptoms or signs related to breast cancer. Breast cancer causes symptoms and signs that must be evaluated and diagnosed by a doctor before pursuing the right course of treatment.
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